Malalai Kakar

Most of us have been trying to understand the current financial debacle (here’s the timeline as the Brits see it), or watching Tina Fey do her Sarah Palin parody using Sarah’s own words.  It’s easy to miss other news.  I heard about Malalai Kakar on the radio yesterday.

From
September 29, 2008

Leading policewoman Malalai Kakar shot dead in Afghanistan

Taleban gunmen shot dead Afghanistan’s most high-profile policewoman yesterday as her teenage son prepared to drive her to work. Malalai Kakar, the head of the city of Kandahar’s department for crimes against women, had been the subject of numerous media reports and was famous for her bravery throughout Afghanistan. She had survived several assassination attempts. A spokesman for the Taleban said that the assassination was carried out by its gunmen. “We killed Malalai Kakar,” said Yousuf Ahmadi. “She was our target, and we successfully eliminated our target.”Her death came as reports emerged of a Saudi-brokered initiative to negotiate between the Afghan Government and the Taleban.  Rest of the article here.

Here’s another article from The Scotsman:

Women in Afghanistan: Dying for the job

Getty

Commander Malalai Kakar was shot dead outside her house on Sunday. (Picture: Getty)

Women in Afghanistan are being murdered simply for going out to work. Those in high-profile jobs are particularly at risk, as the assassination of a high ranking policewoman this week brutally reiterated, writes Emma Cowing.

LIKE MANY working mothers, Malalai Kakar followed a routine most mornings. She would get her six children up and dressed, cook them a thin pancake filled with green onions for breakfast, see them off to school or settled into their daily chores, then head to work herself. But on Sunday morning, as Kakar walked out of her front door on her way to the office, she was shot dead. Her son, who had been due to give her a lift, was critically injured. Her murderers were members of the Taleban. Their target was Afghanistan’s most senior policewoman.

The death of Commander Kakar, who at 41 was head of Kandahar city’s department of crimes against women, has sent shockwaves through the international community. The European Union mission described the attack as “particularly abhorrent” and said she was an “example” to her fellow citizens. Hamid Karzai, the Afghan President, described the killing as “an act of cowardice by enemies of peace, welfare and reconstruction in the country”. But to many, not least her family, Commander Kakar’s death comes as little surprise.

For months she had been the target of death threats, and there had been several previous attacks on her life. She carried a pistol underneath her burqa, and often wore the traditional form of Islamic dress in an attempt to remain unrecognised when travelling within Kandahar. As the first female graduate of Kandahar Police Academy – no mean feat in a city that was once the headquarters of the Taleban and is still home to many of its sympathisers – she became the first woman investigator in Kandahar Police Department, and at the time of her death headed a team of around ten female police officers who made it their priority to protect women’s rights. In Afghanistan, even seven years after the fall of the Taleban regime, such a career does not go unnoticed. Rest of the article here.

What can I possibly say?  I stand in awe and admiration of the brave women mentioned in the article above:

Zurghana Kakar (If you click on that link, scroll down—she’s mentioned toward the end of the article.)  Member of the Afghanistan parliament whose husband was recently killed in an assassination attempt on her life (no relation to Malalai Kakar).

Shukria Barakzai

Malalai Joya

Fatana Gailani, founder of the Afghanistan Women Council

Soraya Sobhrang, member of the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission

RIP Malalai Kakar, Bibi Hoor and Safia Ahmed-jan.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

4 Responses to “Malalai Kakar”

  1. The Proc Says:

    Are you ready for PROCTOBER?

  2. Suebob Says:

    Thanks for bringing attention to this. It is an important subject that doesn’t get enough attention in the US.

  3. Miss Havisham Says:

    Do you think Syrah Palin should be briefed on this before the dbate with Biden on Thursday?

    No.

    Cramming never works.

    If they attempt to stuff any more facts about the world as it is into her pretty little head it will implode and the contents will all come tumbling out like Fibber McGee’s closet.

    There’s too much stuff in there. She’s gonna answer a question with a recitation of the Gettysburg Address or we’ll get hit with the words to Bear Country Jamboree.

    Meanwhile, the woman of substance you write about is not being considered by anyone now–only us.

  4. Pasadena Adjacent Says:

    One of the articles mentioned negotiations with the Saudis (I guess in this case the Saudis are perceived as left of the Taleban) but didn’t mention Hamid Karzai in the proceedings. What a mess.
    I didn’t know but I’m not surprised.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: